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Charlotte Housing Policy Conference on April 24

Posted on April 11, 2019

Join UNC Charlotte Childress Klein Center for Real Estate for the Charlotte Housing Policy Summit on Wednesday, April 24 at UNC Charlotte’s Center City Campus. This event will address Charlotte's housing policy implications based on the analysis discussed in the “State of Housing in Charlotte” report and summit.

 

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Retirees Reshaping Residential

Posted June 18, 2018

Millennials are not the only demographic influencing the housing market; demographers estimate that the age 65-and-over population in the U.S. will double between 2010 and 2060, and this shift will most certainly impact real estate. According to the Curbed article, “The Changing Face of Retirement: Apartment Living, Active Lifestyles and Rural Homes,” retirees want different retirement amenities than previous generations. Traditional retirement communities that are isolated and offer not much more than golf are losing favor to urbanized independent living communities that have “clubhouses, fitness centers, lap pools, and walking trails.” Older adults do not want to be placed on “islands of old age,” the article states, and prefer age integration over segregation in their activities.

Inside WeWork's Communal Housing Project: WeLive

Posted on November 30, 2017

A recent article in Bloomberg Technology, What Life is Like Inside WeWork’s Communal Housing Project, profiled WeLive apartment living to see if the shared common space apartments could reinvent rental housing the same way WeWork has changed office space. WeLive provides fully furnished apartments in the same building as WeWork’s shared office spaces. In the common areas, residents can “cook dinner in an expansive kitchen, shoot pool in the laundry room or get neighborly over free WeWork-provided cocktails on the seventh-floor roof terrace.”

WeLive debuted last year in Washington, D.C., and New York and was expected to have almost three dozen WeLive locations by the end of 2017, but still has only the two original locations. Tenants have been slow to lease, according to the article, because the apartments are as expensive as similar studio units on the market and the communal “dorm for adults” aspect is not appealing to everyone. Those interviewed for the story appreciated the networking and instant social life WeLive provides but several conceded that their units were temporary places to call home until they found something that felt more permanent.