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Top Five US Metros for Life Sciences In 2022

Life sciences

TOP FIVE US METROS FOR LIFE SCIENCES IN 2022

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Growth in the life sciences sector has driven demand in recent years for both commercial real estate space and labor to accommodate this specialized sector. A new study by commercial real estate platform CommercialCafe set out to identify the best metros for life science companies in 2022 and assessed more than 40 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in terms of regional talent pool and workforce; accessibility of local office markets; the degree of availability of existing dedicated property; as well as the state of the local pipeline aiming to expand local life sciences capacity.

Boston took the number one spot on the list, with San Francisco in second place, then San Diego third, New York fourth, and Washington, D.C., rounding out the top five.

A longtime “flagship market” for life sciences, the Boston metropolitan area remains a leader in the sector. The MSA stood out for several key indices scored in the ranking: Boston boasts the largest labor pool among the metros analyzed, as well as the largest life sciences real estate market — nearly 25 million square feet of existing dedicated property, of which just under 14 million square feet was LEED-certified space. What’s more, with an additional 23.8 million square feet of new life sciences developments in the pipeline — under construction, as well as in the planned and prospective stages — Boston seems firmly placed at number one for the foreseeable future.

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The Unexpected Challenges (and Solutions) of Multilevel Warehouse Design

Costco
  • By Russ Hazzard, Jonathan Chang, Development Magazine (photo of Vancouver, B.C. Costco by Raef Grohne)

Experiences in Canada and Asia provide case studies for building these complex properties.

Over the past 15 years, multilevel warehouses — particularly those used for retail purposes — have been a growing trend across Asia and, more recently, in the United States. However, some challenges accompany their design and construction that are not encountered in the traditional approach to large-format retail. With operational criteria at the top of the list, these challenges vary heavily based on several factors, including location, footprint, environment, jurisdictional requirements, and cultural and community influences.

The increase in demand for and construction of multilevel warehouses has unearthed numerous unique considerations not present in traditional warehouse environments. These challenges — each intricate in their own right — have required creative solutions and careful programming to successfully bring each project to life.

Parking and Vehicle Flow

One of the most critical design challenges for vertical warehouses is the traffic flow of vehicles and the structure’s parking. While the goal is to keep the sales level on a single floor for ease of operations and the consumer’s shopping experience, parking for multilevel warehouses can reside either above or below grade. Both options have pros and cons: Below-grade parking requires excavation, which can increase costs and complications. However, it provides a solution for lot coverage or height restrictions in situations where those apply. Above-grade or rooftop parking is preferred as it saves both construction time and money.

Customized resolutions to optimize vehicle traffic flow and increase ease of parking have also been employed, varying from warehouse to country to country. For example, in Sinjhuang, Taiwan, indication lights for open parking spaces are used to determine capacity at a glance. In Suzhou, China, car ramps at the entrance steer customers directly up to each floor, allowing them to bypass complete levels. Larger-than-regulation parking spaces — typically very compact in Asia — are also used, granting customers peace of mind. There is no need to worry about maneuvering around tightly packed vehicles in the garage. As an added benefit, large spaces also increase vehicle flow; running in and out of an area is completed in one move vs. two or three.

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NAIOP on Carried Interest and Update on Senate Passage of Reconciliation Bill

Last week, the U.S. Senate passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, a $740 billion budget reconciliation measure with provisions to address climate change and energy security, extend federal healthcare subsidies, and allow Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices. As we informed you last week, the bill, which had been negotiated by Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), contained a proposal changing the taxation of carried interests that would have harmed the commercial real estate industry and real estate entrepreneurs.

When the Schumer-Manchin agreement was announced, NAIOP and NAIOP Arizona, along with our national real estate allies, mobilized to support Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) in her efforts to oppose the proposed changes to carried interest. In order to ensure her vote, the proposal was dropped from the bill before the legislation was brought up for floor debate.

We are gratified that the concerns of NAIOP and the real estate industry were considered on this very important issue. For more than a decade, NAIOP has successfully opposed various proposals to alter the tax treatment of carried interests, or “promotes” as they are known in real estate. While characterized in the media as affecting Wall Street hedge fund managers, these tax increases would have had a much broader economic impact, impacting real estate partnerships, the venture capital industry and others. We have been engaged with policymakers long before this latest proposal was introduced, and our members’ support has been extremely helpful.

Senator Sinema promised to continue working with Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) to develop legislation reforming carried interest taxation. I want to assure every NAIOP member that, on this and the other important issues affecting commercial real estate, we and our NAIOP chapters will continue our strong advocacy on behalf of you and our industry.

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City Council Members Meet with NAIOP Charlotte for LWAL

Last week, NAIOP members met with City Council Candidates Dimple Ajmera and Marjorie Molina to discuss important issues impacting Charlotte’s CRE industry.

LWAL two

The Lunch with a Leader series provides NAIOP Charlotte members an exclusive opportunity to meet and interact with key leaders in our community. Look for upcoming NAIOP Charlotte fall events here.

LWAL one

UDO Meeting Set For July 11; CLT Water Plan Review Back On

REBIC's Rob Nenfelt and his team put together this week's Two For Tuesday and UDO takes center stage early next week.

UDO - Public Hearing Scheduled for Monday

The Charlotte City Council has scheduled a public hearing on the proposed Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) for Monday, July 11. The Council Action Review begins at 5:00 pm followed by the Public Forum/Business meeting at 6:30 pm. An agenda should be available here by Friday afternoon. Click here to sign up to speakRebic Logo

Also, Planning Staff has just released responses to public comments submitted prior to last Thursday's deadline. Additional changes will be reflected in the next and likely final draft when it is released which will occur prior to the expected vote on adoption in late August. Here's a link to the page containing the Second Draft Public Comments - With Staff Responses.

For additional UDO resources, please visit Charlotte's Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) - (charlotteudo.org).

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Permit Reform Legislation Advances Following NAIOP’s N.C. Advocacy Day

BY TOBY BURKE,   

Members from NAIOP’s three chapters in North Carolina traveled to Raleigh last week to advance the priorities of the commercial real estate development industry in meetings with state lawmakers. The top priority for NAIOP of North Carolina, the state alliance of NAIOP chapters, is the passage and enactment of House Bill 291, permit reform legislation sponsored by State Representative Jeff Zenger.

Local building permits are an essential and fundamental requirement for the development and improvement of commercial and residential properties. However, the processes for obtaining these permits can vary by city and county in North Carolina. These variations lead to uncertainties and delays in projects moving forward, which can impact the costs, financing and contractional relationships with contractors and providers of construction equipment and materials.

The enactment of House Bill 291 would bring reforms to the permitting process similar to those advocated by our local chapter in Georgia which were ultimately enacted into law in that state. These reforms to the local permitting process bring more predictability and accountability, reducing uncertainty and unnecessary delays. Core elements of the bill include:

  • A local permitting entity has 21 days in which review the plans.
  • During the 21 days, the local entity shall resolve issues associated with the application and may seek additional information from the applicant.
  • If additional information is needed or the application must be resubmitted, the permitting entity has 15 days from receipt of the additional information to issue a permit.
  • If the local permitting entity is unable to meet the time parameters, the applicant or inspections department may seek approval from a certified third-party (engineer) or the Department of Insurance.

The North Carolina House of Representatives passed House Bill 291 in May of 2021 on bipartisan vote of 79-33, sending the bill to the state Senate. The legislation was eventually sent to the commerce and insurance committee in March for their consideration. Our meetings last week focused on urging Senate leadership and the committee chairs to move this important legislation forward before adjourning for the year as early as the end of June. NAIOP of North Carolina’s advocacy played a key role in HB 291 being scheduled the following day for a hearing before the insurance committee the subsequent week.


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Cold Storage: Demand, Design and Drivers

 

originally published by  KATHRYN HAMILTON, CAE for NAIOP National with permission to repost. 

Cold Storage

The need for cold storage facilities has exploded as e-commerce sales and grocery delivery demands multiplied during the last few years. Most cold storage facilities primarily handle food preparation or transit as products move toward consumers, but they can also be used for pharmaceutical, floral and chemical needs, among others, and frequently require varying temperature zones all under one roof.

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The Drive for Transportation Electrification

 

originally published by TOBY BURKE for NAIOP National with permission to repost. 

Electric Cars

Governments at every level are considering polices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from both stationary and mobile sources as part of efforts to address climate change. Some of these efforts have centered on initiatives to lowering domestic use on fossil fuels, such as coal, petroleum, natural gas and oil, by moving towards electric vehicles within our transportation system. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the transportation sector is one of the highest sources of greenhouse gas emissions (29%) followed by electricity (25%).

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NAIOP I.CON Preview: What’s Ahead for the Industrial Market?

 

originally published by Connect CRE and shared with NAIOP National

The COVID-19 pandemic changed all our worlds two years ago this month when full-scale shutdowns weighed heavily on the economy and Americans recalibrated their approaches to work and life. Since then, industrial real estate has continued to shine as commercial real estate’s darling – fueled by soaring demand, rising rental rates, and record levels of investment and development activity.

Industrial real estate professionals from across North America will gather in Long Beach, California, on March 23-24, for NAIOP’s industrial conference. Keynote session panelist Dwight Merriman, Partner and Head of Industrial in the Real Estate Group of Ares Management Corporation, sat down with Connect CRE to preview his keynote session: an executive outlook on the future of industrial real estate.

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A New, Turbulent Era for Real Estate Supply Chains

 

originally published by  for Propmodo and shared with NAIOP National

Background Pic

If we’re looking at the effects of the broken supply chain on commercial real estate, it’s best to start at the beginning. And it all begins with the onset of the pandemic and its impact on manufacturers. Michigan Maple Block Company is a good example. On March 24, 2020, the Michigan Maple Block Company furloughed most of its 56 workers at its plant in Petoskey, Michigan.

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Seeing Past the Pandemic: Industrial Demand and U.S. Seaports

 

originally published by Brian Harper, Director of Data Science, Avison Young, and Aaron Ahlburn, Innovation Lead, Global Logistics, Avison Young for the NAIOP Research Foundation

NAIOP Research Pic

Supply chain disruptions have never been more salient to the average consumer. Congested seaports have received particular attention as record levels of inventory have piled up at ports and ships have been stuck offshore waiting to unload. While low levels of vacancy indicate robust current demand for industrial assets, developers, investors and building owners may wonder how closely industrial demand is tied to port activity and whether the current boom is sustainable.

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Industrial Real Estate Opportunities in U.S. First-Mile Markets

 

originally published by TJ Parker for NAIOP Research and Publications

Boxes and Belt Picture

Industrial remains the darling of commercial real estate during the current cycle. Investor enthusiasm has remained strong, with total returns as measured by the National Council of Real Estate Investment Fiduciaries (NCREIF) in double-digit territory over the past cycle and demand showing no signs of slowing, especially as supply chain issues remain a crucial consideration for businesses and real estate developers. While last-mile industrial has been the focus of much of this investment, first-mile industrial is starting to attract attention. 

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How Will Inflation Impact Commercial Real Estate?

 

originally published by GARY TASMAN for NAIOP National with permission to repost. 

Inflation Picture

 

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Unique Adaptive Reuse Projects

 

originally published by BRIELLE SCOTT for NAIOP National with permission to repot. 

Parkandford Apartments

Adaptive reuse projects can often be a high-risk, high-reward proposition, as aging or obsolete assets bring their own set of unique challenges for developers hoping to revitalize or reposition a property for new uses.

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Developing Buildings with a Facilities Management Mindset

 

originally published by MELISSA PLASKONOS for NAIOP National with permission to repost.

Buildings Interior

Often in large development projects, design and construction teams focus on completing the building for the occupants’ short-term needs – about five years out from completion. Yet modern buildings have the potential to reach a lifespan of 30-50 years before requiring major renovations, according to Getty Conservation Institute. As climate change worsens and building resiliency becomes more top of mind for building owners and investors, a more forward-thinking approach to development is necessary.

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Improving the Building Permit Process

 

originally published by VALERIE MAISLIN for NAIOP National with permission to repost.

Development Approval

Building on the NAIOP Research Foundation’s recent study, The Development Approvals Index: A New Tool to Evaluate Local Approvals Processes, several NAIOP chapters and George Mason University have collected data on development approvals across the United States and Canada.  

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Newsletter Winter 2021: Office Demand, Proptech, Adaptive Reuse and More

 

NAIOP Research Pic

Although office net absorption remained negative throughout 2021, it is gradually climbing toward the positive side of the scale.
Office utilization rates remain low due to continued concerns about coronavirus transmission, and the Omicron variant has also introduced a new degree of uncertainty.
However, while a long-term increase in remote and hybrid work arrangements is likely to reduce demand for office space, the authors of the latest NAIOP Office Space Demand Forecast predict this will be more than offset in coming years by employment growth in office-using industries.
 
Demand for new office buildings is also favorable, as new builds offer the flexible work environments demanded in today's more uncertain world.
 

People picVIEWPOINT

"Investors funneled $9.5 billion into Proptech this year. What technologies do you see your business potentially implementing in the future?"

See replies.

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Inside the Complex Cold Storage Sector

 

originally published by JEFF ZBAR for NAIOP National

cold storage

The years leading up to the pandemic were hot for cold storage. It only promises to grow going forward.

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E-Commerce Drives Industrial Development in Q4 2021

 

originally published by LUCIAN ALIXANDRESCU for NAIOP National

warehouse

After the initial shock of the pandemic, industrial real estate emerged as one of the asset classes least affected by the ensuing economic downturn. While the causes are multifaceted, the sudden spike in demand for products ordered and curbside pick-up meant that retailers — both online and brick-and-mortar — scrambled to secure the space they needed to fulfill the influx of new orders.

Read the Full Article Here!

Two for Tuesday - Redistricting Updates

 

originally published by REBIC with permission to repost on CRCBR.

Two for Tuesday - REBIC


 

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