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Can Industrial be a Good Neighbor in Residential Areas?

 

 

Industrial

By Trey Barrineau

Industrial properties are often built near neighborhoods, but that isn’t always popular with the residents, who have legitimate concerns about noise, traffic and pollution from the increased volume of trucks and vans.

A recent NAIOP online panel discussion examined how developers can work with local communities to address these worries through outreach and engagement, as well as with design and technological innovations.

“Education is key to establishing that relationship early on,” said Sven Tustin, executive vice president with Conor Commercial, who moderated the panel. “The developer has to listen to concerns. Residents look at a site plan that shows 200 dock doors, and they assume that there will be 200 trucks coming in and out 24/7.”

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Mitigating Environmental Risks in Life Science Leases

Dangerous chemicals and infectious diseases are among the many hazardous materials that are handled inside life science facilities. Getty Images
By Michael Pollack

A lot of hazardous material passes through these facilities, so caution is necessary.

Life science industries span a range of uses — clinical research and trials; biologics; medical devices; pharmaceuticals; vaccines research, development, manufacturing, and distribution; plant and animal technology; and veterinary products, to name just a few. Leases for life science facilities can present unique challenges and considerations for building owners. Besides the particular demands life science uses place on electrical capacity, HVAC, floor loads, and waste removal, the activities within these facilities can pose many other risks.

Inherent in many life science facilities is the utilization, storage, and/or distribution of hazardous or toxic materials under applicable environmental laws. Of course, most common leases will contain standard indemnification clauses allocating responsibility to the tenant for losses resulting from its activities. 

When it comes to environmental issues, though, there are unique concerns for owners of life science properties. These include the ecological indemnity the principal owners provide to their lender (which typically comes from a well-funded source other than the property owner). There’s also the strict liability imposed under federal law on anyone in the chain of title for additional cleanup costs, whether or not they caused the contamination. 

Also, another lingering fact involves the owner would typically only have recourse from the tenant for a breach of the lease’s environmental restrictions.

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CommercialEdge: Charlotte Office, National Sales and Vacancy Rates Up in Midyear 2022

By Eliza Theiss 

Two and a half years after the pandemic began, the short-term future for the office sector remains uncertain, with record vacancy rates adding to the industry’s woes, according to a recent office report from CommericalEdge. And as hybrid and work-from-home business models continue to take hold — and rising inflation rates further deter workers from returning to traditional office settings — the sector’s long-term prospects are also murky.

Top Markets for Highest Listing Rate Growth

The average full-service equivalent listing rate in the top 50 U.S. office markets was $37.58 per square foot in June — up two cents from the previous month, but down 2.6% from the previous year.

With a 15.6% gain year-over-year (Y-o-Y), Charlotte, North Carolina, continued to lead the market in price growth, increasing its average full-service equivalent listing fee to $33.45 per square foot. Prices in this market grew at progressively faster rates for the fourth straight month.

Similarly, Miami office space ($47.23/square foot) had a gain of 8.4% over the previous year and continued to be one of the fastest-appreciating office markets. But Boston still outperformed it with a 12% increase, thanks to the city’s thriving life sciences industry.

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Industrial Space Demand Forecast, Third Quarter 2022

NAIOP research

By: Hany Guirguis, Ph.D., Manhattan College and Michael J. Seiler, DBA, William & Mary

Amid lower pressure on global supply chains, increasing inventory carrying costs, a cooling economy and a decrease in the rate of e-commerce expansion, retailers and logistics firms have slowed the rate at which they acquired additional industrial space this year. Net absorption of industrial space in the first two quarters of 2022 was 151.2 million square feet, down sharply from 2021’s record pace but still notably higher than in prior years (see Figure 2). The authors expect the still-hot industrial market to cool, and they forecast that the net absorption rate will continue to decline until it returns to the pre-pandemic trend. Total net absorption of industrial space in the second half of 2022 is forecast to be 112.4 million square feet, and full-year absorption in 2023 is forecast to be 209.4 million square feet (see Figure 1 for quarterly projections).

The Industrial Market

Supply chain congestion eased during the first half of 2022, as illustrated by the decline in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Global Supply Chain Pressure Index from 4.35 in December 2021 to 2.41 in June 2022. As a result, retailers and logistics firms have shown less interest in leasing or buying industrial space before it is needed, a trend that contributed to higher absorption in 2021. Amazon’s decision to substantially scale back its expansion plans is the most prominent example of this shift in demand for industrial space. Nonetheless, smaller e-commerce firms, and even traditional retailers, continue to lease more distribution space despite slowing e-commerce growth as more consumers return to shopping at bricks-and-mortar retail. Industrial vacancy rates remain historically low as the ability to supply new space continues to face physical and political limitations in land-constrained markets. These low vacancy rates continue to cause asking rents, and ultimately transaction prices, to increase. Premium prices are being paid for properties with soon-to-expire leases and even vacancies as they allow owners to lease out more space at record-high market rates.

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What the Urban to Suburban Shift Means for the Office Sector

Office

By Marie Ruff

Since the start of the pandemic, sleepy small towns and suburbs have taken on new luster as people have migrated en masse from the urban core, drawn by the lower cost of living and with the flexibility afforded by increased remote work options. Will this be the new normal, or will people move back to the major metropolises once we put the pandemic behind us? What does it mean for office real estate in the short and long term?

In a recent NAIOP webinar, experts from Marcus & Millichap shared their research and insights into how these trends are shaping the investment landscape for urban and suburban office spaces. They began by examining the broader economic context underlying the urban to suburban shift before discussing recent office sale trends, the impact of demographics and what’s ahead for this sector.

U.S. Office Supply and Demand Trends

Office vacancy rates have been elevated since the onset of the pandemic; however, office rate absorption has also been positive for five consecutive quarters. “Although it is soft, it is not as soft as some people perceive,” said John Chang, senior vice president, national director research services, Marcus & Millichap. There was only a brief period of net negative office space absorption in 2020 and have been making a recovery, albeit sometimes slowly, since.

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Top Five US Metros for Life Sciences In 2022

Life sciences

TOP FIVE US METROS FOR LIFE SCIENCES IN 2022

By 

Growth in the life sciences sector has driven demand in recent years for both commercial real estate space and labor to accommodate this specialized sector. A new study by commercial real estate platform CommercialCafe set out to identify the best metros for life science companies in 2022 and assessed more than 40 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in terms of regional talent pool and workforce; accessibility of local office markets; the degree of availability of existing dedicated property; as well as the state of the local pipeline aiming to expand local life sciences capacity.

Boston took the number one spot on the list, with San Francisco in second place, then San Diego third, New York fourth, and Washington, D.C., rounding out the top five.

A longtime “flagship market” for life sciences, the Boston metropolitan area remains a leader in the sector. The MSA stood out for several key indices scored in the ranking: Boston boasts the largest labor pool among the metros analyzed, as well as the largest life sciences real estate market — nearly 25 million square feet of existing dedicated property, of which just under 14 million square feet was LEED-certified space. What’s more, with an additional 23.8 million square feet of new life sciences developments in the pipeline — under construction, as well as in the planned and prospective stages — Boston seems firmly placed at number one for the foreseeable future.

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The Unexpected Challenges (and Solutions) of Multilevel Warehouse Design

Costco
  • By Russ Hazzard, Jonathan Chang, Development Magazine (photo of Vancouver, B.C. Costco by Raef Grohne)

Experiences in Canada and Asia provide case studies for building these complex properties.

Over the past 15 years, multilevel warehouses — particularly those used for retail purposes — have been a growing trend across Asia and, more recently, in the United States. However, some challenges accompany their design and construction that are not encountered in the traditional approach to large-format retail. With operational criteria at the top of the list, these challenges vary heavily based on several factors, including location, footprint, environment, jurisdictional requirements, and cultural and community influences.

The increase in demand for and construction of multilevel warehouses has unearthed numerous unique considerations not present in traditional warehouse environments. These challenges — each intricate in their own right — have required creative solutions and careful programming to successfully bring each project to life.

Parking and Vehicle Flow

One of the most critical design challenges for vertical warehouses is the traffic flow of vehicles and the structure’s parking. While the goal is to keep the sales level on a single floor for ease of operations and the consumer’s shopping experience, parking for multilevel warehouses can reside either above or below grade. Both options have pros and cons: Below-grade parking requires excavation, which can increase costs and complications. However, it provides a solution for lot coverage or height restrictions in situations where those apply. Above-grade or rooftop parking is preferred as it saves both construction time and money.

Customized resolutions to optimize vehicle traffic flow and increase ease of parking have also been employed, varying from warehouse to country to country. For example, in Sinjhuang, Taiwan, indication lights for open parking spaces are used to determine capacity at a glance. In Suzhou, China, car ramps at the entrance steer customers directly up to each floor, allowing them to bypass complete levels. Larger-than-regulation parking spaces — typically very compact in Asia — are also used, granting customers peace of mind. There is no need to worry about maneuvering around tightly packed vehicles in the garage. As an added benefit, large spaces also increase vehicle flow; running in and out of an area is completed in one move vs. two or three.

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City Council Members Meet with NAIOP Charlotte for LWAL

Last week, NAIOP members met with City Council Candidates Dimple Ajmera and Marjorie Molina to discuss important issues impacting Charlotte’s CRE industry.

LWAL two

The Lunch with a Leader series provides NAIOP Charlotte members an exclusive opportunity to meet and interact with key leaders in our community. Look for upcoming NAIOP Charlotte fall events here.

LWAL one

Construction Sites Build a Circular Economy

Genesis Marina

 Phase 3 Real Estate Partners’ Genesis Marina, a 550,000-square-foot life science development south of San Francisco, is the nation’s first precertified TRUE zero-waste project. Photo courtesy of Phase 3 Real Estate Partners

 

By NAIOP Development writer Alice Devine

 

Zero-waste efforts attract greater attention, including a new certification program. 

New buildings can create architecturally pleasing skylines and yet leave construction debris in their wakes. In fact, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that construction and demolition debris accounts for more than twice the amount of generated municipal solid waste in the U.S. 

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Class A Buildings Push Office Market Stabilization

Office market vacancy rates kept surging for the 10th straight quarter to start 2022, according to the NAIOP Research Foundation. The group recently published its Office Space Demand Forecast for Q2 2022. You can read the full report here
Office building
The group boasted that Class A buildings are key in many parts of the country, bolstering net absorption rates in areas like the Sun Belt. These work spaces are key in brining in skilled employees. The group said "suburban markets and life sciences hubs are recovering better than the national average as more employers embrace a return to the office and the pandemic eases."

Other key takeaways mentioned 

  • Leasing activity is up year over year, which signals that firms are more comfortable making longer-term commitments to office space. Property owners have been willing to offer greater tenant improvements to encourage signing, indicating that tenants still have the upper hand in lease negotiations. These signals indicate a move toward a more stable equilibrium as the office market finds its balance.
     
  • Given these trends and signs of a slowing – but still growing – economy, net office space absorption in the remaining three quarters of 2022 is forecast to be 46.9 million square feet, essentially unchanged from the previous forecast for these quarters (46.6 million square feet).
     
  • Total net absorption in 2023 is forecast to be 47.3 million square feet, with an additional 6.5 million square feet absorbed in the first quarter of 2024.

Apply for NAIOP’s National Forums Program

The National Forums program brings together industry professionals in select groups to share industry knowledge, develop successful business strategies and build strong relationships in a confidential and non-competitive setting. Learn more about this unique opportunity and apply for appointment today. 

The Forums provide a unique opportunity for members to openly discuss project challenges, business opportunities and lessons-learned in a confidential and non-competitive setting. Over time, fellow members become a trusted circle of advisors.

The National Forums are an excellent way to become involved, stay in touch and develop new connections with key industry leaders.

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NAIOP NC Conference Moved to 2021

We Can't Wait to See You in Pinehurst
Thursday, March 25 - Friday, March 26, 2021

In light of the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty about the meeting conditions for the remainder of the year, NAIOP NC is cancelling the 2020 NAIOP NC Conference originally scheduled for March 26-27, 2020 at Pinehurst Resort in Pinehurst. At the heart of this decision: we cannot in any way risk the health of our attendees by convening a large group and possibly creating an opportunity to transmit the virus back to member communities.
 
We had an awesome conference scheduled for this year and are excited to carry over the conference to March 25-26, 2021 at Pinehurst Resort.
 
Conference Registration
What do you need to do with your existing conference registration? Absolutely nothing! We have transferred all registrations to our 2021 NAIOP NC Conference March 25-26, 2021. If for some reason you’re unable to make these dates or make a substitution, please email us at [email protected].
 
Hotel Reservations
If you reserved a room at Pinehurst Resort as part of the NAIOP NC block, the hotel cancelled your reservation and refunded your deposit. The room block for the 2021 NAIOP NC Conference will open soon.
 
We look forward to seeing you at the 2021 NAIOP NC Conference!
 
For questions and concerns contact NAIOP Piedmont Triad Chapter at [email protected] or 336-379-0603.
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NAIOP Corporate Operations Remain Open

Today, NAIOP President and CEO Thomas Bisacquino shared the following statement with NAIOP members regarding the operating status of the organization during the COVID-19 situation.

The unprecedented COVID-19 situation is affecting every aspect of our businesses and lives. While NAIOP member benefits and services will not be impacted, the NAIOP Corporate office is adjusting our normal business practices to protect the health and well-being of our staff.

Beginning Monday, March 16, NAIOP Corporate will operate on a virtual basis. Staff are completely reachable during regular business hours (8 a.m.-5 p.m. ET) via phone and email, which you can find on our Contact Us page.

You can renew or modify your membership online, and you can communicate with a membership specialist by emailing [email protected].

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The Forces Shaping Office Space Demand Webinar

Posted on November 26, 2019

Get the inside track on upcoming opportunities in the office sector in this member-only webinar on Dec. 17, 2-3 p.m. EST. This webinar will provide insights and data from the latest NAIOP Office Space Demand Forecast, and identify linkages between overall economic activity and the demand for office real estate.

Learn More & Register Here

New Report: Office Leasing Activity to Sustain Momentum as US Economic Expansion Continues

Posted on December 6, 2019

The NAIOP Research Foundation has published the NAIOP Office Space Demand Forecast for Q4 2019.

Key Takeaways:

  • The U.S. office market continues to perform as expected, with an average of 14.7 million square feet absorbed per quarter in 2019.
     
  • The forecast for the remainder of 2019 and 2020 remains strong at an average of 13.2 million square feet absorbed per quarter in 2020 and 12.7 million square feet per quarter in 2021.
     
  • At present, the economy – and thus the office markets – are expected to remain in an upcycle for at least the next 18 months.
     
  • The effects of the WeWork situation are likely to be isolated to a small set of markets and will not broadly impact the national office market. The company's inability to expand may generate more demand for direct leases in some markets, but overall, coworking appears to be a long-term trend, and the forecast will likely resist any short-term impacts caused by WeWork's recent troubles.

Firms might slow their expansion plans in 2020, reducing the need for new office space, in reaction to overall fears of a slowdown. Still, most measures of consumer health, including wage growth, job growth and consumption expenditures, remain strong.

View the Report

Webinar Nov. 19: Legislative and Political Update

Posted on November 12, 2019

The Advantage Series is an exclusive member benefit, delivering expert insights into the latest research to help you make informed business decisions.

This webinar will provide members with an update on federal legislative activity and executive agency actions affecting the commercial real estate industry, with a specific focus on NAIOP’s top public policy and legislative priorities.  Aquiles Suarez, NAIOP’s vice president for government affairs, and Alex Ford, NAIOP director of federal affairs, will discuss issues including tax legislation, infrastructure, environmental issues and federal regulatory matters.  Attendees can pose questions regarding federal issues affecting their business and gain insights to prepare them for any future regulatory or legislative challenges.

Register Now

New Report: The Evolution of Suburban Office Parks

Posted on October 7, 2019

The NAIOP Research Foundation has published a new report titled "Profiles in the Evolution of Suburban Office Parks," by Dustin C. Read, Ph.D./J.D.

The author interviewed five developers who have recently updated suburban office parks in the United States and Canada to learn how they made these properties relevant for today's market.

Key Takeaways:

  • Redeveloped office parks must fit the preferences of the local workforce and the needs of local employers.
  • Developers should seek to understand local officials' priorities.
  • Developers should build flexibility into their plans and partner with creditors who understand that they may need to adapt to unforeseen circumstances.
  • Developers can maximize the value of their improvements by leveraging design, technology and amenities to develop a property's identity and build community.
  • Rebranding is often a critical component of a successful redevelopment strategy.
 Read the Report.

Earn Your ARGUS Certification through NAIOP

Posted July 1, 2019

Members save $250 by registering to complete their on-demand ARGUS Enterprise certification through NAIOP. Now is the time to invest in your career!

Click here to learn more.

NAIOP Insights: Trending in Commercial Real Estate

Posted on April 23, 2019

 

The biggest thing happening in commercial real estate is digital disruption.

Traditionally, construction and CRE have lagged behind other industries, but technology is changing so rapidly it's setting the framework for how we look at CRE. It's no longer a 40-50 year asset – it's a dynamic process continually being reshaped by the convergence of technologies.

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Carried Interest, QIP Bills Introduced in Congress

Posted on April 1, 2019

Lawmakers return to Washington, D.C., this week after spending time in their districts. Several measures have been introduced that are important to NAIOP and commercial real estate. The Carried Interest Fairness Act of 2019, introduced in the House by Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) and in the Senate by Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), aims to treat certain income currently taxed at the capital gains rate as ordinary income. This would be a major change, since the top capital gains rate is 20 percent and the highest rate on ordinary income is 37 percent.

Less than two years ago, Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA), a law that NAIOP strongly supported. Lawmakers recognized that taxing carried interests at a lower rate than ordinary income provides the necessary incentive for entrepreneurs to undertake risks inherent in development. The provision was therefore kept in place in the new tax law, though a new three-year holding period was imposed. The three-year holding period was intended to ensure that “carried interests” were used primarily for longer-term capital assets.

NAIOP has opposed changes to the taxation of real estate carried interests, and is working with its real estate allies to educate lawmakers in both the House and Senate on the changes already made to carried interest taxation.

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