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Charlotte Douglas International Airport is a Huge Economic Driver!

 

Charlotte Douglas International Airport is bracedfor the impact of more than 900,000 travelers over Thanksgiving.  To put that into context, it's nearly the population of the entire City of Charlotte.  Here are a few more interesting facts:

  • Terminal opened May 2, 1982
  • 118,000 daily passengers
  • 21,000 parking spaces
  • 6,000 acres of land
  • 2022 stats - 47,758,605 passengers, 505,589 arrivals & departures, 207,608 tons of cargo
  • 179 nonstop destinations
  • 36 international destinations

For an interesting discussion about the airport as well as the activities of American Airlines, please take a few minutes to listen to the REBIC podcast with Tracy Montross, Regional Director of Government Affairs for American Airlines.  

Listen Now

Interstate Movers Find Better Real Estate Options in the Mountain West and New England

Originally published on November 9, 2023, by Francis Chantree for NAIOP.

More and more Americans are moving to a different state, often to one inland and less densely populated but with great real estate options. The highest net migration is seen in Idaho, Montana and Vermont, plus Maine and other states offering plenty of space and housing, a trend that fuels the local real estate sectors.

A record 7.9 million Americans swapped states in 2021, 5.8% more than in the year before, and 2022 saw a further increase. By contrast, relocating within the same state decreased year-over-year by 7.7% in 2021. A recent StorageCafe study ranked states by net migration figures, analyzing the number of people arriving minus those leaving for every 1,000 residents.

New England and the Mountain West region are joined in popularity by states ranging from South Carolina to Nevada. Many relocate from often-expensive places like California or New York; better housing costs and availability – boosted wherever there is generous self-storage provision – are key drivers of interstate migration. Many people on the move don’t necessarily give up good salaries, not least because the enduring work-from-home trend can make anywhere in the country an option.

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NC Department of Transportation (NCDOT) to Approve Commercial Permits Through Accela

Effective immediately, NCDOT will be utilizing Accela (The City of Charlotte's Plan and Permit Platform) to approve Subdivision permits and Plats.  They are also testing out the process for Commercial permits.  For continuity and a better user experience, please submit your plans to the City through Accela and NCDOT through its existing portal.  Here are additional details:

  • Please contact the NCDOT review engineer for that area.
  • Email subject line: Include the NCDOT Permit Number and Accela number provided through the NCDOT Permit Portal to identify the project quickly.
    • Plats: Include the NCDOT-approved permit number associated with the plat.
  • NCDOT Comments: Staff comments will be through the NCDOT Permit Portal.
    • Accela plan will have a generic comment stating that NCDOT comments will be available through the NCDOT Portal.  
    • Plans must also be submitted through the NCDOT Portal.
If you have any additional questions about this new process, please get in touch with Hassan Malik, Acting District Engineer - NCDOT via email or at (980)523-0000 or (980)264-0386.

Wisconsin City Proposes Transportation Utility User Charge

Originally published on August 16, 2023, by Jim Villa from NAIOP.

Earlier this year NAIOP Wisconsin was made aware that the City of Wauwatosa was looking to fast-track the adoption of a transportation utility user charge or fee (TUF) in order to generate additional revenue for local transportation and infrastructure needs. The city cited the deferred maintenance of their aging infrastructure, fiscal infrastructure constraints set by state funding limits, and an equitable fee structure based on who uses the road for the new fee. The proposal was set to be considered for approval in July. Our concern was that the adoption of the transportation utility fee in Wauwatosa might lead to other cities considering similar unlawful measures for additional revenue.

The transportation utility fee would apply to both residential and commercial properties based on the vehicle traffic generated by the property’s use, and not necessarily their valuations. The city would cap the annual fee at $51.00 for single-family properties with a sliding scale for other properties based on national engineering standards. 

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When Cities Eliminate Parking Minimums, What Happens Next?

Originally published in Summer 2023 by Robert Ferrin for the NAIOP Development Magazine.

Creative solutions and community engagement are crucial when dealing with changes to parking policies.

Minimum parking requirements, which require building owners to provide a fixed number of parking spaces, have played a key role in American municipal policy since the 1920s. Following their widespread adoption in the 1960s, these laws significantly impacted the design of cities and strongly contributed to the growth of a car-centric culture. Today, there are an estimated two billion parking spaces in the U.S., according to a March article in the New York Times.

In 2017, Buffalo, New York, ushered in a new era when it became the first major U.S. city to abolish parking minimums. Minneapolis, Raleigh, San Jose, and others followed. At the beginning of 2023, California became the first state to abolish parking minimums for developments located near public transportation routes.

Affordable housing, transit, and environmental advocates celebrated these policy changes. They point to lower development costs, improved walkability, and increased multimodal transportation, which reduces carbon emissions and vehicle congestion. Together, they can help municipalities meet their climate action goals.

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CLT Transportation, Planning, & Development Committee Provides Important UDO Update

Originally published on August 8, 2023, by Rob Nanfelt the Executive Director for REBIC.

During yesterday's meeting of the Transportation, Planning, and Development Committee, Charlotte Planning Director Alyson Craig provided an update on staff activities related to the new Unified Development Ordinance (UDO).  Here's what we know so far about the next round of proposed text amendments:

  •  #2023-093 was filed on June 16th, had a public hearing on July 17th, and will be considered for adoption by the full City Council on August 21st.  This is a minor change and will ensure that homes built before June 1st, 2023, will be allowed as conforming uses in the OFC (office flex campus) and CG (general commercial) zoning districts.
  • Another text amendment (not yet available for public review) was filed at the end of July and would allow multi-family uses in CG (general commercial) and CR (regional commercial) zoning districts.  According to staff, it will include elements of #2023-057 which was denied by Council on May 15th, primarily due to confusion over an attached drive-through provision.
  • One more amendment that has not yet been filed will amend allowed uses in Campus Zoning Districts and may include the addition of a new district.  This has been a major point of contention and we welcome the clarification when it comes.
Also discussed was the May 22nd Council Referral regarding duplexes and triplexes in Neighborhood 1 Zoning Districts.  Staff is contemplating filing a future text amendment that would allow these units to comprise 70% of proposed developments with the other 30% required to be single-family homes located near the property line adjacent to existing neighborhoods.  How these percentages/ratios would be determined - portion of development related to size, number of units, number of structures - has yet to be determined.  Expect to see action on this in early fall.

A tree canopy analysis has been underway for some time and the results will be released in September/October with recommendations to follow.  Apparently, the findings will include significant details including the impact of carbon sequestration, temperature fluctuations, and growth models.  

Alyson Craig's Full Presentation

The Future of Electric Vehicle Charging: A Guide for Commercial Real Estate Developers

Originally published on July 27, 2023, by Trey Barrineau for NAIOP.

Electric vehicle (EV) use is accelerating, and commercial real estate owners can reap significant benefits from installing EV charging infrastructure at their properties. A recent NAIOP webinar explained how EV charging station implementation can attract and retain tenants, improve the property’s environmental score and generate new revenue streams.

According to Bryce Christensen, P.E., a senior partner with Kimley-Horn, EVs are becoming more affordable. Of the more than 40 options currently on the market, he said that 10 now cost under $40,000, and nearly every major automaker made public commitments to EVs, which should boost adoption by helping bring prices down even more.

“It’s no secret that the market share of electric vehicles in the United States and worldwide is trending up,” Bryce said. “The demand is rising, and many potential consumers are just waiting for more charging infrastructure before committing to going all electric.”

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How Supply Chains and Logistics Drive Site Selection

Originally published by Adam Roth for the Spring 2023 Issue of NAIOP Development Magazine.

The “Rule of 1.5” explains the impact of transportation costs on industrial real estate.

A recent Q&A in the Wall Street Journal with Marie-Christine Lombard, CEO of international freight-forwarding firm Geodis SA, includes a comment that sums up the current state of the global logistics industry: “The entire supply chain is being rethought and recalibrated and re-costed.”

Lombard is correct. Risk is being assessed differently and the supply chain is changing, which means industrial real estate will follow.

For example, when transportation costs 10 times more than rent, transportation will dictate site selection. It is far and away the biggest determining factor that goes into where companies locate industrial real estate. Specifically, there is a concept called the “Rule of 1.5,” which is defined as whatever affects transportation will impact industrial real estate a year and a half later.

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CLT Transportation Committee Meets to Discuss Next Steps on UDO

The Transportation, Planning, and Development Committee held its first meeting of the new council term and reviewed its charge and procedures.  Members of the Committee, along with Mayor Pro Tem Braxton Winston who also attended, heard several presentations from planning staff that included:

To view the full agenda and video, click the links below:

Parking in a Post-pandemic Economy

Originally published by Robert Dunphy in the Summer 2022 NAIOP Development Magazine Issue.

As workers return to offices and shoppers return to stores, new parking strategies may emerge.

The COVID-19 restrictions that began in March 2020 led to business closures and a sharp cutback in personal travel that caused demand for parking to plummet. Except for curbside pickup of retail purchases and carry-out meals, most travelers stayed home and avoided commercial and private parking lots and on-street spaces.

In April 2020, passenger travel on roads declined by 60%, while public transit usage fell by 81%, and air travel slumped by 96%, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics. It was not until the spring of 2021 that passenger car travel returned to 2019 levels on average, but with wide variations across the country.

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November Bonds Ahead for Charlotte, Gastonia; CLT Groups Form From 2040 Plan

Bonds on November Ballot For Charlotte, Gastonia

On Nov. 8, Gastonia residents will vote on a $75 million Transportation General Obligation Bond Referendum. The City Council approved the bond referendum at its Aug. 2 meeting.  

Proposed projects include:

  • Street and road repairs
  • Pedestrian walkways (sidewalks)
  • Street resurfacing
  • Utility relocations
  • Street intersection improvements
  • Street light improvements

For more information, visit this link.       

Charlotte voters will also have the opportunity to vote on a $226 million bond package that will upgrade and enhance streets, build housing for low-to moderate-income individuals and families, and improve infrastructure in the city's older neighborhoods and emerging high-growth areas. 

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2040 Planning Academy Starting Tuesday, June 21

2040 Planning Academy

2040 Planning Academy Starting Tuesday, June 21

Do you have questions about all the development you see in CLT? Do you want to know more about how CLT plans for its future? Are you interested in influencing the future of your neighborhood?

The 2040 Planning Academy, formerly the Community Planning Academy, is a free 5-class program aimed at helping residents better understand the role planning plays in building communities. Through group discussions, presentations, and interactive activities, participants will learn when and how they can be involved in planning processes and help influence the future of their community.

The application window is open starting today, Tuesday, June 21, 2022, and will close on Sunday, July 17, 2022, at midnight.

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Permit Reform Legislation Advances Following NAIOP’s N.C. Advocacy Day

BY TOBY BURKE,   

Members from NAIOP’s three chapters in North Carolina traveled to Raleigh last week to advance the priorities of the commercial real estate development industry in meetings with state lawmakers. The top priority for NAIOP of North Carolina, the state alliance of NAIOP chapters, is the passage and enactment of House Bill 291, permit reform legislation sponsored by State Representative Jeff Zenger.

Local building permits are an essential and fundamental requirement for the development and improvement of commercial and residential properties. However, the processes for obtaining these permits can vary by city and county in North Carolina. These variations lead to uncertainties and delays in projects moving forward, which can impact the costs, financing and contractional relationships with contractors and providers of construction equipment and materials.

The enactment of House Bill 291 would bring reforms to the permitting process similar to those advocated by our local chapter in Georgia which were ultimately enacted into law in that state. These reforms to the local permitting process bring more predictability and accountability, reducing uncertainty and unnecessary delays. Core elements of the bill include:

  • A local permitting entity has 21 days in which review the plans.
  • During the 21 days, the local entity shall resolve issues associated with the application and may seek additional information from the applicant.
  • If additional information is needed or the application must be resubmitted, the permitting entity has 15 days from receipt of the additional information to issue a permit.
  • If the local permitting entity is unable to meet the time parameters, the applicant or inspections department may seek approval from a certified third-party (engineer) or the Department of Insurance.

The North Carolina House of Representatives passed House Bill 291 in May of 2021 on bipartisan vote of 79-33, sending the bill to the state Senate. The legislation was eventually sent to the commerce and insurance committee in March for their consideration. Our meetings last week focused on urging Senate leadership and the committee chairs to move this important legislation forward before adjourning for the year as early as the end of June. NAIOP of North Carolina’s advocacy played a key role in HB 291 being scheduled the following day for a hearing before the insurance committee the subsequent week.


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Ports to Trucks: Overcoming Supply Chain Challenges

 

originally pusblished by KATHRYN HAMILTON, CAE  for NAIOP National with permission to share:

Supply Chain

 

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The Drive for Transportation Electrification

 

originally published by TOBY BURKE for NAIOP National with permission to repost. 

Electric Cars

Governments at every level are considering polices to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from both stationary and mobile sources as part of efforts to address climate change. Some of these efforts have centered on initiatives to lowering domestic use on fossil fuels, such as coal, petroleum, natural gas and oil, by moving towards electric vehicles within our transportation system. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the transportation sector is one of the highest sources of greenhouse gas emissions (29%) followed by electricity (25%).

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Catawba Crossings Public Meeting Tomorrow February 2, 2022 from 4:30-7:30PM

 

originally published by REBIC with permission to repost. 

Catawba Crossing

Catawba Crossings

The Catawba Crossings Project will evaluate the feasibility of a new roadway between Gaston County and Mecklenburg County. The Project includes two new bridges over the South Fork Catawba River and Catawba River and a new interchange with I-485.

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Release of the Draft Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) Guidelines

 

The Charlotte Department of Transportation (CDOT) has released for public review and comment a draft of the Comprehensive Transportation Review (CTR) Guidelines. 

These guidelines are a key component to implementing the 2040 Plan and the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO).  As stakeholders and partners in the development of the UDO, we value your continued engagement, review, and input.

Why are they important?

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The Future of Goods Distribution and the Supply Chain

originally published by Trey Barrineau for NAIOP National

Card over Bridge

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, supply chain problems have become pervasive. In fact, things are getting so bad that many fear they could imperil the all-important holiday shopping season this year.

Michael Landsburg, chief development officer with NFI Real Estate, said there are currently 70 cargo ships anchored off the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, California. A month ago, there were about 40.

Read the Full Article Here!

Public Meetings for 1-77 Corridor Project are on April 21 and May 13

In January 2020, representatives from the Charlotte Regional Transportation Planning Organization (CRTPO) publicly launched Beyond 77, a project focused on improving travel along the I-77 Corridor from Statesville, N.C. to Rock Hill, S.C. To date, over 19,000 surveys have been completed in an effort to prioritize transportation alternatives for the area. In early April, the third and final public engagement phase kicked off, where participants are asked to weigh in on potential solutions. Residents who live, work or travel through this region are encouraged to participate in the study by visiting Beyond77.com and taking a brief survey.

For those who want to hear directly from the planning team, representatives from the Beyond 77 study will be hosting two Virtual Public Meetings on April 21 and May 13 from noon to 1 p.m.

To learn more about the public meetings and to register, visit Beyond77.com/Register.

Preparing for a New Normal in Commercial Real Estate

Originally published on June 5, 2020 by Shawn Moura, Ph.D. 

The coronavirus pandemic has accelerated social and economic changes that were underway before the outbreak, while also leading consumers, workers and employers to adopt new preferences and behaviors. Collectively, these changes will require that commercial real estate firms adopt new approaches to design, customer relations and business operations to be successful in the future. Christopher Lee, founder and CEO of CEL & Associates, offered his predictions for how the outbreak will reshape demand for commercial real estate in the U.S. and outlined steps that firms can take to remain competitive during a recent NAIOP webinar.

Lee observed that the commercial real estate market is currently about halfway through a downturn. Although the Federal Reserve’s intervention in credit markets and fiscal stimulus measures have mitigated some of the outbreak’s effects on the economy, “all of that is going to burn off fairly soon unless another economic stimulus comes forward.” Substantial economic uncertainty and fears about the coronavirus have paralyzed decision-making in most markets. Buyers are concerned about the pandemic’s effects on building revenues and expenses as well as potential liabilities from infections, and some may no longer be able to secure favorable financing for an acquisition. Sellers are uncertain whether they should sell now or wait out the pandemic, and are unsure whether they will have good options for investing the proceeds of a sale.

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